Archive for June, 2013

Newsletter for June 25 – July 1 (Stir-Fried Bok Choy with Cashews)

After a very late start we are now swimming in strawberries, so they will make up a large part of the share this week. We also have good picking, so if you’d rather take 2 $5.50 Pick-your-own vouchers instead of the berries and come by in the next few weeks to pick your own strawberries, you’re welcome to do so! You would be able to pick 4 and a half pounds of berries with $11 worth of vouchers, which is about 3 quarts. We open the fields for picking at 7:00, and the morning is often the best time to come (it’s still fairly cool), especially if you bring bug spray to keep the mosquitos at bay!

Small Share:

2 quarts strawberries ($11)

1 bunch scallions ($2)

1 coupon for $$ off baking powder biscuits (made by Baker’s Dozen in Essex)

Choose 3 options (note: You can always take double or triple of the same option) ($7.50-$9)

1 head bok choy

1 lb zucchini

1 bunch young kohlrabi

1 large bunch fresh mint

1 lb rhubarb

1 $5.50 PYO voucher (counts as 2 options)

There is a chance we might have enough snow peas to give these out as an option as well.

Single Share:

1 quart and 1 pint strawberries ($8.25)

1 bunch scallions ($2)

1 coupon for $$ off baking powder biscuits

Choose 2 options ($5-$6)

(If you want to skip the pint of strawberries and take 1 extra option that is fine)

1 head bok choy

1 lb zucchini

1 bunch young kohlrabi

1 large bunch fresh mint

1 lb rhubarb

1 $5.50 PYO voucher (counts as 2 options)

There is a chance we might have enough snow peas to give these out as an option as well.

Large Share:

2 quarts Strawberries ($11)

1 pint snow peas ($3)

1 bag baby spring mix ($3)

1 bunch scallions ($2)

coupon for $$ off biscuits

Choose 4 options ($10 – $12)

1 head bok choy

1 lb zucchini

1 bunch young kohlrabi

1 large bunch fresh mint

1 lb rhubarb

1 $5.50 PYO voucher (counts as 2 options)

There is a chance we might have enough snow peas to give these out as an option as well.

Bread

This week we’re giving our raisin bread from O Bread Bakery in Shelburne. O Bread is a family owned and operated bakery, and they make delicious European-style breads. You can learn more about Chuck and Carla and their bakery (based at Shelburne Farms) here: http://www.obread.com/. Everyone with the egg add-on also gets eggs this week as well.

Recipes

If you have yet to check out the Yankee Kitchen Ninja Blog, now is the time to do it! Julianne lives in Jericho and writes a “CSA Rescue” post every Monday or Tuesday. You can tell her what you would like help with in the comment section of the blog and she will give you great recipe ideas and tips. She knows that Paul Mazza’s CSA members are getting scallions and lots of strawberries this week, so she’s going to offer up recipes for these items on Tuesday. Check out her blog here:

http://yankee-kitchen-ninja.blogspot.com/

Here recipe ideas and tips for scallions and strawberries can be found here: http://yankee-kitchen-ninja.blogspot.com/2013/06/csa-share-ninja-rescue-2013-scallions.html

Kohlrabi and Bok Choy

Julianne also has postings about Kohlrabi (http://yankee-kitchen-ninja.blogspot.com/2013/06/csa-share-ninja-rescue-2013-kohlrabi-6.html) and Bok Choy (http://yankee-kitchen-ninja.blogspot.com/2012/05/csa-share-ninja-rescue-bok-choy-and.html)

These are great places to start if you’d like to try out these two delicious vegetables for the first time.

I also want to share my favorite way to eat young kohlrabi: raw, cut into thin slices. You can peel the bulbs if you want, but when they’re small it’s not necessary. You can cut the slices into matchstick and add them to a salad or a slaw, or you can just eat the slices sprinkled with salt or dipped in hummus or your favorite vegetable dip. You can also cook up the greens and eat them as a side-dish, or even cut them into thin strips and add them to a stir-fry.

Basic Stir-Fried Bok Choy

My favorite way to eat Bok Choy is to stir-fry it. I use this very basic recipe from the food network website, but alter it depending on what I have. I like it with a bit less sesame and soy sauce, and with a little bit of fish sauce. I also add a teaspoon or so of sugar when I add the soy sauce, and sometimes start with a few cloves of chopped garlic (cook the garlic for a minute or so in the oil before you add the bok choy.) You can add chopped scallions to the dish when you add the bok choy if you’d like, or garnish with them (yum!).

One final tip: Don’t leave out the dark green leaves! These are full of vitamins, and add taste and texture to the stir-fry. It’s a little boring and one-note without them.

Directions

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add bok choy and saute 3 minutes. Add soy sauce and red pepper flakes and cook 2 more minutes, until bok choy stalks are tender-crisp and leaves are wilted. Season, to taste, with salt and black pepper. Arrange bok choy on plates and top with cashews just before serving.

 

 

 

 

 

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Newsletter for June 18 – June 24 (Creamy Potato Salad with Radishes and Lemon, Turnip Greens with Soy and Sesame

We have lots of strawberries this week, so everyone gets some! We’re waiting until the fields are nice and full of ripe berries to open Pick-Your-Own. We’re hoping they’ll be open by the end of the week; as long as we get a few sunny days that shouldn’t be a problem. PYO vouchers will be available this week, so you can take one instead of the already picked berries, or instead of something that you might not need or want. The vouchers are good for any PYO berry, so if you don’t get around to picking strawberries you can use them for blueberries or raspberries later in the season.

We’re running about a week and a half behind last year, but we’re hoping to have a few new items next week. There are already tiny zucchinis and summer squashes on the plants out in the field, and if we’re lucky we might even have some peas next week. And there will be plenty more berries, of course!

We’re also giving out a coupon for Eastern peaches to CSA members this week. The peaches are from South Carolina and very good (much better than the ones from California!). Feel free to use the coupon any time during the next week. You can also pass on the coupon if you like; it’s just an extra and not included when we calculate the value of the CSA share.

Small Shares:

1 quart strawberries or 1 $5.50 PYO voucher ($5.50)

1.5 lbs. rhubarb ($3.75)

1 bunch young turnip greens ($3)

1 lb. hot house tomatoes ($3)

1 bunch chives or mint ($1.5)

1 Eastern peach coupon

Choose 1 of the following options: ($2)

(These options will change day by day. We’ll have radishes on Wednesday for sure though, since people who picked up on Wednesday missed out last week)

1 bunch scallions

1 bunch radishes

2 lbs. white potatoes

1 $2 PYO strawberry voucher

Total retail value: $18.75

Single Share:

1 pint strawberries ($2.75)

1 bunch turnip greens ($3)

1.25 lbs. rhubarb ($3)

1 tomato ($2)

1 bunch chives or mint ($1.5)

1 Eastern peach coupon

Choose 1 option: ($2)

1 bunch scallions

1 bunch radishes

1.5 lbs. white potatoes

1 $2 PYO strawberry voucher

Total retail value: $14.25

Large Share:

2 quarts strawberries or 2 PYO vouchers ($11)

1 bunch spring mix ($2)

1 bunch turnip greens ($3)

1.5 lbs. rhubarb ($3.75)

1.5 lb. hot house tomatoes ($4.5)

1 bunch chives or mint ($1.5)

1 Eastern peach coupon

Choose 2 options: ($4)

1 bunch scallions

1 bunch radishes

1.5 lbs. white potatoes

1 $2 PYO strawberry voucher

Total retail value: $29.75

Bread

Everyone who gets bread will be getting La Panciata’s rosemary and garlic focaccia this week.

Turnip Greens

The arugula we had planted for the CSA drowned in all the rain, but we have turnip greens for everyone this week. Turnip greens, especially when young, are a tasty and underappreciated green. They taste a bit like collard greens or kale with a bit of a turnip-y kick. My go-to way to cook them is just to chop them into strips and toss them in a sauté pan with a little bit of canola or vegetable oil. Sauté until wilted (5 minutes or so) and then add soy sauce, sesame oil, and red pepper flakes to taste. This goes really well with rice and grilled meat or fish.

You can also prepare your turnip greens as you would southern collards (slow cooked with bacon or salt pork), or boiled and tossed with sautéed with bacon and onion and topped with hot sauce, as in this BBQ-style recipe: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Leon-ONeals-Turnip-Greens-108862

(Note: Don’t want turnip greens? Ask for $3 PYO voucher or extra rhubarb instead.)

Creamy Potato Salad with Radishes, Lemon, and Chives

(Adapted from Fine Cooking Magazine. See the original recipe here: http://www.finecooking.com/recipes/creamy_potato_salad_radishes.aspx)

If you have potatoes left from last week, this salad is a fantastic way to use them. It’s light and creamy at the same time, and tastes of spring (even if the potatoes are from last fall!)

  • 2 pounds white or yukon potatoes, peeled and cut into ¾ inch (approx.) chunks
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 – 2 cups thinly sliced radishes (about 8-16)
  • 3 scallions (white and tender green parts), chopped
  • 1 bunch chopped chives
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream, well chilled
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise or ¼ cup mayonnaise and ¼ cup plain yogurt
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons grated lemon zest
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • 2 tablespoons drained capers (optional)

Put the potatoes in a medium saucepan, cover with water by an inch or two, add a large pinch of salt, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium, partially cover, and cook until the potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes. Test for doneness by spearing a potato with a thin metal skewer. It should penetrate easily into the center of the potato and then slide right out. If the skewer lifts the potato out of the pot when you withdraw it, continue cooking a little longer. Drain the potatoes and let them cool. You can drain them on a cooling rack set over or in your sink, which will avoid squashing the tender potatoes (as often happens with a colander) and also lets the potatoes cool quickly.

When the potatoes are at room temperature put them in a mixing bowl. Add the radishes, scallions, and half of the chives and fold gently to distribute; set aside.

In a small bowl, whisk the cream until frothy but not at all stiffened. Whisk in the mayonnaise, yogurt (if using), and mustard. Add the lemon juice, zest, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste. Pour the dressing over the salad and fold it in with a rubber spatula. Taste for seasoning. Serve, garnishing with remaining chives, or cover and chill for up to a day.

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

Follow the link below to our 2010 newsletter that contains a great recipe for strawberry rhubarb pie:

https://paulmazzascsa.com/?s=strawberry+rhubarb+pie

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Newsletter for June 11 – June 17 (Quinoa Salad with Feta and Mint, Rhubarb Snack Cake)

This has been a tough spring for us, and for most farmers in the area. We had a long, hot, dry spell in May followed by rain, rain, and more rain! Our strawberries need some warm, sunny days to really start to ripen up. Hopefully we’ll get some and next week’s share will be all about berries. We’re hoping to be able to open up the PYO fields soon, too!

Thankfully our potatoes from last fall stored beautifully, so we’ll be able to give everyone a good amount of those. Our rhubarb has also done well this spring, as have our scallions and radishes. We were also able to get our hands on some hot house tomatoes from VT Hydroponic, which we’ll be giving out this week, along with some fresh herbs.

Because we haven’t been bringing in much money yet this spring due to the late berry crop, the CSA money has been incredibly helpful. For the fourth year in a row we have been able to pay for labor, seeds, equipment, and more without taking out hefty spring loans. So thank you!

This Week’s Produce

(This may change day by day; depends on the weather!)

Small Share

5 lbs. chef white potatoes (from last fall) ($4)

1 large bunch radishes ($2)

1 large bunch scallions ($2)

1.5 lbs. rhubarb ($3.75)

2 VT Hydroponic tomatoes (or one large) ($3)

1 bunch fresh mint or 1 bunch fresh oregano ($1.5)

Total Retail Value: $16.25

Large Share:

8 lbs. chef white potatoes ($5)

1 large bunch radishes ($2)

1 large bunch scallions ($2)

2 lbs. rhubarb ($5)

3 VT Hydroponic tomatoes (or 2 large) ($4.5)

1 bunch mint and 1 bunch oregano (or 2 of each) ($3)

Hopefully: asparagus ($5)

Single Share:

4 lbs. chef white potatoes ($3.25)

1 bunch radishes or 1 bunch scallions ($2)

1.25 lb. rhubarb ($3.25)

1 VT hydroponic tomato ($1.5)

1 bunch mint or 1 bunch oregano (or 2 lbs. extra potatoes) ($1.5)

Total retail value: $11.5

Bread and Eggs

Tomorrow is an egg week, and the bread is going to be Red Hen’s chewy and delicious fresh ciabatta.

Fresh Herbs

(Greek Quinoa Salad with Fresh Mint)

This year we are going to try to make fresh herbs optional most weeks. So you will be able to choose either a bunch of some type of herb or something else of equal value, like a pepper or a cucumber or two. This week, however, we don’t have enough produce to do this, so everyone gets fresh herbs. Oregano is great in home-made tomato sauce and in all sorts of Italian dishes. Fresh mint is great in drinks (iced tea, mojitos, mint juleps), as well as salads and sauces. One of my favorite ways to use fresh mint is in a simple quinoa salad. Just mix cooked, cooled quinoa, drained chick peas, chopped tomatoes, chopped scallions (green and white parts), chopped fresh mint, crumbled feta, and some fresh lemon juice and olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. Delicious, and very healthy!

Rhubarb

One of the simplest ways to prepare rhubarb is just to cook it down with a tiny bit of water and sugar to taste (I like about 1/3 cup per pound). It takes about 15 minutes over medium heat (stirring often) to get a wonderful sweet-tart sauce that you can serve warm or cold over cake, pancakes, ice cream, or yogurt.

You could also save your rhubarb for when the strawberries are ready and make a classic strawberry rhubarb pie or tart. Or you could try an all-rhubarb dessert like this addictive rhubarb snack-cake:

Rhubarb Snack-Cake

(From the Smitten Kitchen Blog)

Cake
1 1/4 pound (565 grams) rhubarb, trimmed and cut into 1/2-inch lengths on the diagonal
1 1/3 cup (265 grams) granulated sugar, divided
1/2 cup (1 stick, 4 ounces or 115 grams) unsalted butter, softened
1/2 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
2 large eggs
1 1/3 cups (165 grams) all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
3/4 teaspoon table salt
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1/3 cup (80 grams) sour cream

Crumb
1 cup (125 grams) all-purpose flour
1/4 cup (50 grams) light brown sugar
1/8 teaspoon table salt
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
4 tablespoons (1/2 stick, 2 ounces, or 55 grams) unsalted butter, melted

Make the cake: Preheat your oven to 350°F. Coat the bottom and sides of a 9×13-inch baking pan with butter or a nonstick cooking spray, then line the bottom with parchment paper, extending the lengths up two sides. (It will look like a sling). Stir together rhubarb and 2/3 cup sugar and set aside. Beat butter, remaining sugar and lemon zest with an electric mixer until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, scraping down the sides after each addition. Whisk together flour, baking powder, 3/4 teaspoon table salt and ground ginger together in a small bowl. Add one-third of this mixture to the batter, mixing until just combined. Continue, adding half the sour cream, the second third of the flour mixture, the remaining sour cream, and then the remaining flour mixture, mixing between each addition until just combined.

Dollop batter over prepared pan, then use a spatula — offset, if you have one, makes this easiest — to spread the cake into an even, thin layer. Pour the rhubarb mixture over the cake, spreading it into an even layer (most pieces should fit in a tight, single layer).

Stir together the crumb mixture, first whisking the flour, brown sugar, table salt and cinnamon together, then stirring in the melted butter with a spoon or fork. Scatter evenly over rhubarb layer. Bake cake in preheated oven for 50 to 60 minutes. The cake is done when a tester comes out free of the wet cake batter below. It will be golden on top. Cool completely in the pan on a rack.

More Recipes

Here’s a recipe for a delicious egg, tomato, and scallion dish: http://www.thekitchn.com/chinese-comfort-food-stirfried-60599. If you’re on facebook, feel free to share links to recipes online that you like on the CSA facebook page.

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