Newsletter for August 4 (Pesto, Kale Chips)

Good afternoon! I just got word that we were able to harvest 20 bushels of cauliflower a few hours ago, and that there are plenty more out in the field. This means that, along with cukes, squash, kale, and carrots, cauliflower will also be an option this week! We also have tons of beautiful basil, so we are giving some to everyone and also offering large bunches as an option. This is the week to make pesto, if you want to do it! One of my favorite summer meals is sauted green or golden zucchini tossed with hot pasta and plenty of pesto. Here’s how to make a basic pesto:

Basic Basil Pesto

(Adapted from The Food Network)

Ingredients

2 cups packed fresh basil leaves

2 cloves garlic

1/4 cup pine nuts (or walnuts)

2/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1/2 cup freshly grated Pecorino cheese

Combine the basil, garlic, and pine nuts in a food processor and pulse until coarsely chopped. Add 1/2 cup of the oil and process until fully incorporated and smooth. Season with salt and pepper.

If using immediately, add all the remaining oil and pulse until smooth. Transfer the pesto to a large serving bowl and mix in the cheese.

If freezing, transfer to an air-tight container and drizzle remaining oil over the top. Freeze for up to 3 months. Thaw and stir in cheese.

Cauliflower

Cauliflower is fantastic in pretty much anything. Curries, stir-fries, pasta salads, green salads. . . it’s also great tossed with olive oil and roasted or steamed and served with a creamy cheese sauce. Want to try something different? I’ve had more than one CSA member mention to me that they love to roast a whole head of cauliflower as in this dramatic recipe.

Kale

We give out kale every other week for most of the season. You never have to take it, but if you’d like to give it a try but are unsure where to start, here’s one of my favorite kale recipes. It’s great for people new to kale and for kids. Cooking the kale this way gives it a nice toasty flavor and makes it much less bitter. It still tastes like kale, just milder (and saltier and crunchier!)

Kale Chips

1 bunch kale

1 tbsp. olive oil or canola oil

Salt and pepper to taste

Pre-heat oven to 300 degrees. Wash kale and remove stems and thick center rib. Tear into “chip” sized pieces. Place kale on 2 baking sheets. Toss kale with oil until coated. Spread out on sheets. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Bake until kale is crisp but not brown (about 15 minutes).

This Week’s Produce

Single Share

½ pint blueberries

2 lbs new potatoes

1 cucumber

1 bunch basil or 1 extra cuke

Choose 3 options:

1 large head or 2 small heads cauliflower

1 bunch carrots

3 zucchini

1.3 lbs pickling cukes

1 $3 PYO voucher

1 bunch Kale

1 bunch Chard

1 large bunch basil

Possible: Lettuce, beans, shelling beans

Small Share

1 pint blueberries

4 lbs new potatoes

1 cucumber

1 bunch basil or 1 extra cuke

Choose 3 options:

1 large head or 2 small heads cauliflower

1 bunch carrots

3 zucchini

1.3 lbs pickling cukes

1 $3 PYO voucher

1 bunch Kale

1 bunch Chard

1 large bunch basil

Possible: Lettuce, beans, shelling beans

Large Share

2 pints blueberries

4 lbs new potatoes

2 cucumbers

2 bunches basil or 2 extra cukes

Choose 4 options:

1 large head or 2 small heads cauliflower

1 bunch carrots

3 zucchini

1.3 lbs pickling cukes

1 $3 PYO voucher

1 bunch kale

1 bunch chard

1 large bunch basil

Possible: Lettuce, beans, shelling beans

Leave a comment

Newsletter for July 28 (Chicken and Vegetable Curry)

Speaking to so many CSA members over the past 6 years I’ve learned that many of you have a tradition of cooking up the last of the CSA veggies in a stir-fry on the night before your next pick-up. If you’ve been doing this and are growing bored with stir-frys, a very easy curry-type dish is always an option too! I made one the other night with baby bok choy, potato, and chicken, and it was fantastic. Not particularly authentic, but delicious and very easy:

End-of-Week Chicken Curry:

1 tbsp olive oil or butter

1 large onion, chopped or thinly sliced

1 can coconut milk

1-2 cups chicken broth

1-2 tbsp curry powder or curry paste (to taste)

1 lb skinless, boneless chicken, cut into 1-inch pieces (I use tenders)

Salt and pepper

Red pepper flakes or chopped chilis (optional)

Fresh lime juice (optional)

Chopped fresh cilantro (optional)

Saute the onion in oil or butter until soft. Add coconut milk, stock, and curry powder or paste (you can also add red pepper flakes or chilies now). Bring to boil. Add chicken and vegetables and return to boil. Lower heat to simmer and cook, covered, until chicken is fully cooked and vegetables are tender. Remove from heat. Add salt and pepper (and lime juice and cilantro if using). Adjust seasoning to taste and serve as is or over rice.

Choose 2-3 of the following and cut the vegetables into 1-inch pieces (or much thinner if veggies are hard like carrots or potatoes)

Zucchini

Golden Zucchini

Potatoes

Sweet potatoes

Butternut squash

Baby bok choy

Carrots

String beans

Peas (any type, in pod or out)

Eggplant

Bell peppers

Chard

Cauliflower

Note: You could replace the chicken with canned, drained garbanzo beans for a vegetarian version. This would be particularly good with potatoes or zucchini and swiss chard.

Zucchini

We started growing golden zucchini this year, and we have tons of it. Golden Zucchini tastes just like green zucchini, so you can use it just as you would green zucchini (or summer squash). I am a huge fan of zucchini sliced lengthwise and cooked in butter or olive oil until golden brown, but you can also make green or golden zucchini into pretty much anything you wish: bread, muffins, pancakes, soup, “pasta”, and chips. You can grill it, add it to stir-fries, soups, pasta dishes, and curries. It’s probably one of the most versatile vegetables around, so if you’re sick of one preparation I’d advise giving another a try!

Discounts/Bread

There was a PA peach/nectarine coupon in Sunday night’s email and I will have a tomato coupon for anyone who’s like one at the pick-up. We also still have $1 off VT cheese for CSA members. We have VT Creamery Chevre, Grafton Creamery Cheddars, and Maplebrook fresh Mozzarella. The bread this week will be Red Hen’s Ciabatta, which would be wonderful with sliced tomatoes and some fresh Mozzarella!

This Week’s Produce

Single Share

1/2 pint blueberries

2 ears corn

1 bunch beets or carrots

1 cucumber or 1 bunch parsley

Choose 3 options:

1 head lettuce

1 lb bag beans

1 bunch chard

3 yellow zucchini

1.3 lbs pickling cucumbers

1 $3 PYO voucher

Possibly: Broccoli, shelling peas

Small Share

1 pint blueberries

4 ears corn

1 bunch beets or carrots

1 cucumber

1 bunch parsley or 1 extra cuke

Choose 3 options:

1 head lettuce

1 lb bag beans

1 bunch chard

3 yellow zucchini

1.3 lbs pickling cucumbers

1 $3 PYO voucher

Possibly: Broccoli, shelling peas

Large Share

1 pint blueberries

8 ears corn

2 bunches beets or carrots

2 cucumbers

2 bunches parsley or 2 extra cukes

Choose 4 options:

1 head lettuce

1 lb bag beans

1 bunch chard

3 yellow zucchini

1.3 lbs pickling cucumbers

1 $3 PYO voucher

Possibly: Broccoli, shelling peas

Leave a comment

Newsletter for July 21 (Broccoli Salad with Garlic and Sesame Vinaigrette)

The beautiful weather is starting to make up for the rainy, cold spring; vegetables are coming in fast, and we have lots of them! Most years we just have a little corn when it starts — not nearly enough to give some to every CSA member. This year we have plenty right away, though, so everyone gets some. We didn’t grow any of the early, sugar-enhanced corn this year, so the first corn of the season is a super-sweet variety, and it is fantastic! You really can’t mess up when cooking fresh, super-sweet corn, but here are a few things you can do to make sure your corn is perfect:

Don’t remove the husk until right before cooking.

Use your corn within 2-3 days (it will still be good if you wait, but it’s best to use it sooner)

Always store your corn in the refrigerator.

Don’t overcook! Fresh sweet corn only needs 3-4 minutes in boiling water, or a bit more on the grill.

In a hurry and don’t want to heat up your house? Microwaved corn is incredibly easy and surprisingly good!

Pickling Cucumbers

Pickling cucumbers are great for pickles, but they are also delicious eaten raw in salads, or as a snack (kids in particular often like to snack on these since they’re perfectly “kid-sized”). I like them because they don’t have to be peeled, and because they are sweeter and crunchier than regular “table” cucumbers. The one drawback: they don’t last as long as regular cukes. Try to avoid keeping them in your fridge for more than 5 or 6 days.

Pennsylvania Peaches

Every year we carry Pennsylvania peaches on our stand. We get these peaches in wooden crates from small growers, mostly in the Amish country. These peaches are by far the sweetest, juiciest, most delicious peaches you will ever try (I generally will not buy peaches or nectarines unless it’s July or August and they are from Pennsylvania). We don’t give the peaches out as part of the share since we don’t grow them ourselves, but I will have coupons for 50 cents off a lb on these peaches for the next few weeks.

Broccoli

We have tons of broccoli this week, so everyone gets some! Please just let me know if you’d like to pass and take extra of something else. Broccoli, like cucumbers, makes a great cold summer salad. Here’s one recipe that I love because it’s flavorful, the broccoli stays pretty crisp, and it requires very minimal cooking. It calls for a bit more broccoli than we’re giving out, but it would be easy to adjust. You could also toss in a kohlrabi bulb cut into thick matchsticks if you’d like!

Broccoli Salad with Garlic and Sesame Vinaigrette

By Melissa Clark, From The New York Times Cooking Blog

  • 1 ½ teaspoons red wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, more to taste
  • 2 heads broccoli, 1 pound each, cut into bite-size florets
  • ¾ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 4 fat garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 teaspoons cumin seeds
  • 2 teaspoons roasted (Asian) sesame oil
  • Large pinch crushed red pepper flakes.
  1. In a large bowl, stir together the vinegar and salt. Add broccoli and toss to combine.
  2. In a large skillet, heat olive oil until hot, but not smoking. Add garlic and cumin and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Stir in sesame oil and pepper flakes. Pour mixture over broccoli and toss well. Let sit for at least 1 hour at room temperature, and up to 48 (chill it if you want to keep it for more than 2 hours). Adjust seasonings (it may need more salt) and serve.

Nutritional Information

Leslie Langevin from Whole Health Nutrition has kindly offered to provide CSA members with nutritional info about different veggies that we are giving out this week. Every week I will include her write-up about a specific fruit or veggie or two at the bottom of the e-mailed newsletter. She and Whole Health Nutrition are a great, locally-owned resource if you’re looking for any sort of help with your diet!

This Week’s Produce

Single Share

1 large broccoli crown

4 ears corn

1 head lettuce

1 lb pickling cucumbers

1 bunch parsley (or 2 extra cukes)

Choose 2 options:

1 basket berries (probably a pint of strawberries or a 1/2 pint of raspberries)

1 bunch kale

1.5 lbs squash (will probably be green or golden zucchini)

3 regular cucumbers

1 $3 PYO voucher

One of the following: Kohlrabi or baby bok choy

Small Share

1 lb broccoli

6 ears corn

1 head lettuce

1 lb pickling cucumbers

1 bunch parsley (or 2 extra cukes)

Choose 3 options:

1 basket berries (probably a pint of strawberries or a 1/2 pint of raspberries)

1 bunch kale

1.5 lbs squash (will probably be green or golden zucchini)

3 regular cucumbers

1 $3 PYO voucher

One of the following: Kohlrabi or baby bok choy

Large Share

1.5 lbs broccoli

8 ears corn

2 heads lettuce

1.3 lbs pickling cucumbers

1 bunch parsley (or 2 extra cukes)

1 bunch beets

Choose 4 options:

1 basket berries (probably a pint of strawberries or a 1/2 pint of raspberries)

1 bunch kale

1.5 lbs squash (will probably be green or golden zucchini)

3 regular cucumbers

1 $3 PYO voucher

One of the following: Kohlrabi or baby bok choy

Leave a comment

Newsletter for July 14 (Strawberry Yogurt Popsicles)

With the arrival of cucumbers and beans we are really starting to come into the mid-summer vegetables. As you already know if this isn’t your first year as a CSA member, we grow a lot of produce right up through the first frost (which is usually in October). So we will have beans, cukes, and zucchini and/or summer squash as part of the share off and on until then. Corn, which should arrive soon, and the late summer veggies (like tomatoes and peppers) are the same way; we have them until a hard frost kills the plants.

Other produce — like peas and strawberries — won’t be around much longer. This is pretty late for strawberries, but, as I write this on Monday, the picking is still good in Essex. The berries are getting softer, though, so if you don’t eat them right away it’s a great week to make berry smoothies or popsicles (see recipe below). You can even try this super simple recipe for strawberry ice cream made in a blender.

Strawberry-Yogurt Popsicles

Looking for a something different and (kind of) healthy to do with strawberries? Try these yummy strawberry-yogurt popsicles from the Kitchn blog:

Makes 6 popsicles (3-ounce molds)

1 pint fresh strawberries, hulled and roughly chopped

1/4 cup sugar

1 teaspoon lemon juice

6 to 8 ounces (about 1 cup) Greek yogurt

Combine the strawberries and sugar in a small bowl. Let stand about 20 minutes to macerate the fruit, stirring occasionally. The fruit will soften and become syrupy.

Pour the strawberries and syrup into a food processor or blender. Add the lemon juice and pulse a few times until the fruit is pureed.

Stir the yogurt into the strawberry mixture until combined. Pour into molds and freeze for at least 8 hours or overnight. To remove, run hot water over the outside of the mold until you can gently pull the popsicle out.

Notes:

  • You can substitute nearly any seasonal fruit (or mix of fruits!) for the strawberries in this recipe.
  • For harder fruits, like rhubarb and under-ripe peaches, try cooking down the fruit with the sugar and a few tablespoons of water over medium heat. This helps soften them and concentrate their flavor.

Herbs

We have a pick-your-own herb garden in Essex, which is where I get most of the herbs we give out as part of the CSA. We grow chives, oregano, mint, sage, thyme, flat-leaf parsley, curly parsley, dill, and cilantro. As you know if you have your own herb garden, some of these are around all season, and some (like cilantro) go to seed quickly. Right now our cilantro isn’t doing too well — we are going to try to plant a few new rows — but all the other herbs are doing great. You can always come to the Essex farm and cut your own herbs (it’s $10/lb, but most bunches are light so it’s usually $1 or less), or you can ask to pick some of an herb of your choice in place of the herb I’m giving out as part of the share. If you pick up in Colchester and want a replacement herb feel free to e-mail me and, as long as we have some, I’ll bring it along!

Snow Peas

Snow peas are great in any type of stir-fry (I particularly like them with bok choy). They’re also good alone, just sauteed in butter or olive oil and maybe some garlic (you can add a bit of water to the pan to keep the garlic from burning if you’re using it). You can add torn leaves of fresh basil right before serving too. This makes a really nice side dish — just add some grilled or pan-cooked fillets of fish and some rice and you have an easy and delicious summer meal.

This Week’s Produce

Single share:

1 pint strawberries

1 pint snow peas

1 cucumber

1 bunch basil (or 1 extra cucumber)

Choose 3 options:

1 lb yellow beans

1 bunch swiss chard

1.3 lbs pickling cucumbers

1.3 lbs zucchini (or summer squash)

1 $3 PYO voucher

1 head (or 2 small heads) lettuce

Possible: bok choy, broccoli, extra peas or berries, kohlrabi

Small share:

1 quart strawberries

1 pint snow peas

1 cucumber

1 bunch basil (or 1 extra cucumber)

Choose 4 options:

1 lb yellow beans

1 bunch swiss chard

1.3 lbs pickling cucumbers

1.3 lbs zucchini (or summer squash)

1 $3 PYO voucher

1 head (or 2 small heads) lettuce

Possible: bok choy, broccoli, extra peas or berries, kohlrabi

Large Share

2 quarts strawberries

2 pints snow peas

2 cucumbers

2 bunches basil (or 2 extra cucumbers)

Choose 4 options:

1 lb yellow beans

1 bunch swiss chard

1.3 lbs pickling cucumbers

1.3 lbs zucchini (or summer squash)

1 $3 PYO voucher

1 head (or 2 small heads) lettuce

Possible: bok choy, broccoli, extra peas or berries, kohlrabi

Leave a comment

Newsletter for June 7 (Kale Salad with Sunflower Seeds and Cherries, Chive Viniagrette)

Even after a VERY busy 4th of July weekend we still have tons of strawberries to pick in Essex — we have late varieties that are just starting, and with the warm days they are ripening fast! We don’t have any more pick-your-own strawberries in Colchester, but we do have PYO raspberries at both locations and blueberries at the Colchester location. Shawn put a coupon for a discount on PYO strawberries on the farm facebook page and I’ve included one at the bottom of this newsletter. You can print the coupon out or just show the cashier on your phone.

For the share this week we have more strawberries, plus sugar snap peas, squash, chives, and lots of options. It would be a good week to make a zucchini and snap pea stir-fry (great with beef or tofu), or to finally make a strawberry-rhubarb pie or crisp if you haven’t yet (this is probably the last week for the strawberries and the rhubarb). You could also make a maple-chive vinaigrette (see recipe below) and put it on a salad of lettuce, chopped sugar snap peas, and thinly sliced purple top turnip or kohlrabi.

Kale

The kale has been growing slowly this year, like everything else, due to the wet weather. Because of this the leaves and bunches will be a bit on the small side. Young kale is great sauteed with olive oil and garlic, or chopped up and made into a kale salad. One of the nice things about young kale is that the center rib isn’t too tough so there’s no need to cut it out.

Kale Salad with Sunflower Seeds and Cherries

(Adapted from Cooking Light)

1 1/2 tablespoons cider vinegar

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1 teaspoon honey

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

1/4 teaspoon pepper

1 small bunch young kale, chopped into ribbons

1/4 cup dried cherries

1/4 cup sliced red onion

2 tablespoons sunflower seed

Combine vinegar, olive oil, Dijon mustard, honey, salt, and pepper in a large bowl. Add kale, dried cherries, onion, and sunflower seeds; toss.

Turnips

I am hopefully that we will have enough turnips to offer them as an option this week. Purple top turnips (or young rutabagas, which we might have as well) can be sliced and steamed, boiled and then mashed, or cut into fries and roasted, with or without other root vegetables. When they are small and fresh, though, they’re best raw. A great way to enjoy them is to slice them thinly and used atop a green salad along with a simple dressing like the vinaigrette below:

Chive Vinaigrette

2 tsp. maple syrup

2 tsp. dijon mustard

4 tbsp red wine vinegar or fresh lemon juice

½ cup extra virgin olive oil

1 bunch of chives, chopped

salt and pepper

Put all ingredients in a mason jar with a top. Shake well.

You can store the dressing in the jar for a week or so. Just shake before using.

(This method is very easy but makes a slightly thinner dressing than the method of slowly whisking the oil into the other ingredients to emulsify. You can do it that way too!)

Raspberries

Although we did get picked out in Essex on Friday due to the record number of people who came out to pick, there are still plenty of PYO raspberries in Essex and Colchester (they just take a day to ripen). As you probably know if you’ve picked or bought raspberries this year, you need to use them quickly. They have been starting to mold less than a day after being picked, so you really want to use them or freeze them within 24 hours. To freeze raspberries just wash them, spread them out on a baking sheet, and then freeze until hard. Then put the frozen raspberries in a freezer-proof bag. You can use the frozen berries in smoothies, baked goods (pancakes with frozen raspberries are great), or jam.

Single Share

1 quart strawberries

1 pint sugar snap peas

1 squash (will be either zucchini or summer squash)

1 bunch chives or 1 extra squash

Choose 2 options:

1 head lettuce

1 bunch kale

1 lb rhubarb

1 $3 PYO voucher

Possible: purple top turnips, ½ pint raspberries, bok choy, kohlrabi, extra squash (will try to have at least 2 of these).

Small Share:

1 quart strawberries

1 pint sugar snap peas

1+ lb squash (will be either zucchini or summer squash)

1 bunch chives or 1 extra squash

Choose 3 options:

1 head lettuce

1 bunch kale

1 lb rhubarb

1 $3 PYO voucher

Possible: purple top turnips, ½ pint raspberries, bok choy, kohlrabi, extra squash (will try to have at least 2 of these).

Large Share:

2 quarts strawberries

2 pints sugar snap peas

1+ lb squash (will be either zucchini or summer squash)

1 bunch chives or 1 extra squash

1 bunch scallions

Choose 3 options:

1 head lettuce

1 bunch kale

1 lb rhubarb

1 $3 PYO voucher

Possible: purple top turnips, ½ pint raspberries, bok choy, kohlrabi, extra squash (will try to have at least 2 of these).

 

____________________________________________________________________________

Now through 7/10

Pick 10 Lbs of strawberries or more(approx. 1 full PYO tray) and save .25 per lb!

Please present this coupon or show your phone to receive discount

____________________________________________________________________________

 

Leave a comment

Newsletter for June 30 – July 6 (Lemon Garlic Swiss Chard)

Hopefully the wet weather will come to an end soon! This is the peak of strawberry season, and drier weather is always better for pick-your-own and for harvesting berries for retail and for the CSA. The berries are still delicious, but you want to use them ASAP because mold is always an issue when conditions are so wet. The same goes for pick-your-own berries. The picking has been great, but use those berries in a day or two! And if you come to pick after it’s been raining, it’s always smart to wear your rain boots.

The wet weather isn’t really an issue when it comes to squash, rhubarb, or bok choy, but you want to use your lettuce pretty quickly too. Lettuce grown on the east coast always rots much faster than California grown lettuce, which is what most grocery stores sell. When the weather conditions are so wet, the shelf life of local lettuce is even shorter. The best way to store your lettuce is to cut off the bottom and wash and dry all the leaves. Then store them in your crisper in an OPEN plastic bag. Lettuce rot often starts at the base of the head, so cutting off the bottom and just storing the loose leaves is always a good idea. I like to wash and dry the leaves too since they last longer this way and since I’m also more likely to make a salad if I already have clean lettuce ready to go in the fridge!

Rhubarb

Rhubarb is an option this week, and we still have plenty! I’ve been sent lots of great recipe ideas from CSA members, and I wanted to share a few here:

Rhubarb Soda Syrup http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2015/04/strawberry-rhubarb-soda-syrup/

Rhubarb BBQ Sauce http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/rhubarb-barbecue-sauce

Rhubarb Ice Cream http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/refreshing-rhubarb-ice-cream

Orange-Rhubarb Bread http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/orange-rhubarb-bread

Recipes

Have a great recipe to share? You can post it (or a link) on the CSA facebook page, or email it to me, or both. You can also find any recipe from a newsletter from the past 5 years on the CSA website. Just type the name of the recipe or a veggie from the recipe into the search box and you should have no problem finding your recipe. If you type “bok choy” into the search box, for instance, you will find two different newsletters containing bok choy recipes, including this one for stir-fried bok choy with cashews (which would be great with some snow peas, too!)

Swiss Chard

Swiss chard is probably one of the healthiest foods you can eat. It’s also delicious, with a bitter/sweet earthy flavor that’s similar to spinach. I’ve mentioned in the past that my favorite way to eat chard is sauteed in butter or olive oil with lots of onions and mushrooms (this is fantastic over cheesy scrambled eggs). It’s also great with some lemon, garlic, and parmesan cheese, as in this recipe from Cooking Light:

Lemon Garlic Swiss Chard

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon minced garlic

12 cups Swiss chard, chopped (about 10 ounces)

2 tablespoons water

1 1/2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

4 teaspoons shaved fresh Parmesan cheese

Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add garlic; sauté 2 minutes or until garlic begins to brown. Add Swiss chard and 2 tablespoons water to pan; cook 3 minutes or until chard wilts. Stir in lemon juice and pepper. Sprinkle with cheese.

This Week’s Produce

(If we are able to pick a lot of raspberries everyone will have a choice between strawberries and raspberries)

Single Share:

1 quart strawberries

1 head lettuce

1 zucchini

1 bunch fresh mint or 1 extra zucchini

Choose 2 options:

1 pint peas (will be snow or sugar snap)

1 bunch swiss chard

1 lb rhubarb

1 $3 PY0 strawberry voucher

We will have at least 2 of the following options (they will change from day to day): bok choy, kohlrabi, extra strawberries, radishes, extra squash, scallions

Small Share:

1 quart strawberries

1 head lettuce

3 zucchini

1 bunch fresh mint or 1 extra zucchini

Choose 3 options:

1 pint peas (will be snow or sugar snap)

1 bunch swiss chard

1 lb rhubarb

1 $3 PY0 strawberry voucher

We will have at least 2 of the following options (they will change from day to day): bok choy, kohlrabi, extra strawberries, radishes, extra squash, scallions

Large Share:

2 quarts strawberries

2 heads lettuce

3 zucchini

2 bunches fresh mint or 2 extra zucchini

Choose 3 options:

1 pint peas (will be snow or sugar snap)

1 bunch swiss chard

1 lb rhubarb

1 $3 PY0 strawberry voucher

We will have at least 2 of the following options (they will change from day to day): bok choy, kohlrabi, extra strawberries, radishes, extra squash, scallions

Leave a comment

Newsletter for June 23 – June 29 (Pasta with Turkey Sausage and Zucchini)

I’m glad we started the CSA a bit late this year, since the rainy June has slowed things down a bit.  Despite the wet weather we have plenty of strawberries (see below for Pick-Your-Own conditions) and rhubarb, so this is the week to make strawberry rhubarb pie, muffins, or jam! If for some reason the strawberries disappear before you get around to cooking or baking, remember that plain rhubarb also makes great pie and really delicious jam.

We also have tons of lettuce, bok choy, squash, and radishes. We lost some of the early greens we planted to flooding, but the kale and chard are on higher ground and should be ready within the next few weeks. The peas were slowed down a bit by the rain but are on their way as well!

I will be at all of the pick-ups, and for the first few weeks I will be the one checking everyone in. If you want to do any substitutions just let me know when you come to pick up. We have limited berries but plenty of everything else!

Pick-Your-Own Conditions

Because of the wet fields we haven’t been able to open PYO in Essex yet. We are open in Colchester (135 Poor Farm Rd), and we are hoping to open soon in Essex. We just need it to dry up enough to be able to get cars out into the fields! If you want to pick, your best bet is to call first, especially this week. The Essex number is 879-3760 and the Colchester number is 879-0102.

We offer PYO berry vouchers as an optional part of the share throughout the season. These can be used to pay for pick-your-own strawberries, blueberries, or raspberries. The blueberries and raspberry picking will start in a few weeks. PYO strawberries are $2.75 a lb, so a $2 voucher will get you a bit less than a pound. Many weeks we offer $3 or $6 vouchers too.

Bread

This week the bread is Red Hen’s Ciabatta. It is not too late to decide to get a bread share! If you’d like to add bread to your weekly share just let me know in the next week or so. We can prorate the cost of the bread share if you miss the first week or two.

Cheese and Other Discounts

We have a variety of VT cheeses at the Essex stand every day and at the Colchester stand on CSA pick-up days. CSA members always get a dollar off cheese (just tell the cashier that you’re a CSA member). Right now we have different cheddars from Grafton Village Creamery, and we will be getting other varieties as the season goes on. We will also have coupons for CSA members at pick-up some weeks. This week everyone gets a coupon for a 50 cents off per pound on Georgia peaches. The coupons are always optional; just take one when you’re checking in if you think you might use it in the next week.

Oregano

This week all CSA member get a bunch of fresh oregano (unless you know you won’t use it and want to take an extra squash instead). I love zucchini or summer squash sauteed in butter with thinly sliced onions or scallions and fresh oregano (just add the oregano at the very end). You can also try this pasta dish, which makes a easy and healthy dinner:

Pasta with Turkey Sausage and Zucchini

(From Real Simple magazine)

12 ounces bucatini or spaghetti

1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon olive oil

1 pound Italian-style turkey sausage links, casings removed

1 pound zucchini and/or summer squash (about 4 small), thinly sliced

1 large onion, chopped

4 cloves garlic, chopped

kosher salt and black pepper

1/2 cup grated Parmesan (2 ounces), plus more for serving

1/4 cup fresh oregano leaves

  1. Cook the pasta according to the package directions. Reserve ½ cup of the cooking water; drain the pasta and return it to the pot.
  2. Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat 1 teaspoon of the oil over medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook, breaking it up with a spoon, until browned and cooked through, 10 to 12 minutes. Transfer to a plate.
  3. Reduce heat to medium and add the remaining tablespoon of oil to the skillet. Add the zucchini and/or squash, onion, garlic, ½ teaspoon salt, and ¼ teaspoon pepper. Cook, tossing occasionally, until the vegetables are golden and very tender, 15 to 18 minutes (reduce heat if the pan begins to darken).
  4. Toss the pasta with the sausage, vegetables, Parmesan, oregano, and ¼ cup of the reserved cooking water (add more cooking water if the pasta seems dry). Serve with additional Parmesan.

This Week’s Produce

Single Share:

1 pint strawberries

1 lb rhubarb

1 head lettuce

2 squash (might be summer squash or zucchini)

1 bunch fresh oregano (can sub 1 extra

squash)

Choose 2 options:

1 bunch radishes

1 head bok choy (or two small)

1 $2 PYO berry voucher (will get you $2 worth of any PYO berry)

1 extra head of lettuce

2/3 lb rhubarb

Possible: kohlrabi, other greens, extra squash

Small Share:

1 quart strawberries

1.3 lbs rhubarb

1 head lettuce

2 squash (might be summer squash or zucchini)

1 bunch fresh oregano (can sub 1 extra squash)

Choose 3 options:

1 bunch radishes

1 head bok choy (or two small)

1 $2 PYO berry voucher (will get you $2 worth of any PYO berry)

1 extra head of lettuce

2/3 lb rhubarb

Possible: kohlrabi, other greens, extra squash

Large Share

2 quarts strawberries

2 lbs rhubarb

1 head lettuce

3 squash (might be summer squash or zucchini)

2 bunches fresh oregano (can sub 2 extra squash)

1 bunch scallions

Choose 3 options:

1 bunch radishes

1 head bok choy (or two small)

1 $2 PYO berry voucher (will get you $2 worth of any PYO berry)

1 extra head of lettuce

2/3 lb rhubarb

Possible: kohlrabi, other greens, extra squash

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